Vaccines for Kittens & Cats

A vaccination plan lays the perfect foundation for a healthy life for your feline friend.

Your kitten’s first year of healthcare is important to give them a good start to their life. Vaccines and regular veterinary exams are highly recommended during this time. Whether you decide to keep your feline companion indoors or outdoors, a veterinarian can provide services and advice to keep them healthy.

When should my indoor kitten/cat be vaccinated?

It’s commonly believed that indoor cats don’t need to be vaccinated, however, this is wrong. Indoor cats can get diseases from other animals within the home, parasites, and some viruses can be brought into the home on inanimate objects like clothing, shoes, etc. Between 6 to 8 weeks, kittens are given a combination vaccine for feline viral rhinotracheitis, calicivirus, and panleukopenia. After two weeks, they will be given a booster plus an examination. Once your kitten has completed the kitten series vaccinations, your veterinarian will discuss boosters throughout the year as necessary. To schedule your kitten’s vaccines please call us at 204-589-8381.

When should outdoor kittens/cats be vaccinated?

When your cat frequents the outdoors, they are exposed to more bacteria and viruses. This is why your veterinarian will recommend additional vaccines. The following is a general timeline of when your outdoor kitten or cat should be vaccinated:

  • 6 to 8-weeks-old: FVRRC, FIV (feline immunodeficiency virus) and examination
  • 8 to 10-weeks-old: FIV vaccine
  • 10 to 12-weeks-old: FeLV (feline leukemia), FIV, FVRCC (Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus and Feline Chlamydiosis), and exam
  • 16-weeks-old: FIV, Rabies, FeLV, and exam

Are vaccines safe for cats?

Vaccine complications are very rare and mild. It is normal for your loyal companion to have swelling at the injection site, soreness, fever, and lethargy. These symptoms last for no more than 48 hours. Your feline companion has a higher chance of developing diseases without vaccines and the chances of the vaccine being dangerous are extremely low.

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